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Lawrence Epps – The Shit Job Machine

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The Frontroom is proud to present the installation The Shit Job Machine by Artist Lawrence Epps starting January 2014.

Epps is an artist best known for his large scale installations and has exhibited in galleries, museums and sculpture parks in the UK and abroad. His recent pavilion, Take Stock, at the 2013 British Ceramics Biennial attracted thousands of visitors to take away a unit each until the whole sculpture was dismantled over the course of the show.  The sculpture was then replaced with a projection of the disappearing sculpture, played in reverse – the taking became the making.

 

Epps was also responsible for the 8,000 little clay men which appeared on the streets of Manchester as part of his installation Human Resources at FutureEverything in 2012. Informed by a mass Twitter response the public were invited to pick up and take home the small terracotta workers if they found them.

 www.lawrenceepps.com

 

The Shit Job Machine is accompanied by texts created by Lawrence Epps and poet and writer Holly Corfield Carr, which will be available at the show.

 

Holly Corfield Carr is a poet and writer based in Bristol.  Her work appears in print and performance across the UK, with recent publications in Ambit, Aesthetica, Poetry London, Iota and The Island Review.  She received an Eric Gregory Award from the Society of Authors in 2012 and was the 2013 Writer-in-Residence at Spike Island, with support from Arts Council England.

 

 

Opening hours:

10th – 24th January 2014

10 – 4 pm  Mon-Fri

 

Join us for the Private View:

9th January, 6 – 8 pm

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Frontroom promo

      The Frontroom is proud to present the installation The Shit Job Machine by Artist Lawrence Epps starting January 2014. Epps is an artist best known for his large scale installations and has exhibited in galleries, museums and sculpture parks in the UK and abroad. His recent pavilion, Take Stock, at the 2013 [...]

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To launch our 2013 programme we’ve invited Kleeep-a-Kleeep, Bad Timing and the infamous Steak and Honour for an evening of experimental sound, great dialogue and classic American burgers.
We’d like you to come too.

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up-coming: possible area – sole possession


20 April – 31 May 2013

Workshop and Dialogue session, 10 May

Private View, 31 May

 

possible area takes control of the Frontroom as a personal and creative space,

exposing the accumulating results of an individual’s daily activities of collecting, planning, performing and re-organising (and attempting to combine these).

 

Over a number of weeks the project will explore the conflicts between different kinds of attempts — creative and neurotic — to control a space, reflecting the cumulative decisions and indecisions involved.  Inspired by individuals and amateur obsessives who are driven to present whatever space is available to them as workshops, museums or public venues, the increasingly undomesticated space will host sound works, live performances and other events.

 

possible area is interested in creating immersive environments, exploring the creation of spaces within spaces, with a particular interest in scale and place.  Recent installation-based projects have also developed a cumulative way of working, exploring and exposing DIY processes across installation, sound, moving image and visual works.

 

possible area is an ongoing project of visual work by J. K. Brook across graphics, moving image, installation and intervention. This work primarily is often closely related to live music and sound event production, as part of bad timing and other projects. Recurring themes are place, obsolete technology, breaching the boundaries of enclosed and public space and the mapping of spaces onto each other (and back onto themselves).

 

Recent activities include installation and cross-arts event production works at Aid & Abet and a DIY arts-centre venue installed within the front room of a small Cambridge terraced house.

 

 

http://www.possible-area.org/   (will be updated including a project blog)

 

twitter @possiblearea

 

possible area takes control of the Frontroom as a personal and creative space,

exposing the accumulating results of an individual’s daily activities of collecting, planning, performing and re-organising (and attempting to combine these).

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